Blog site transfer

Hello everyone,

We will be posting future MGC blog entries to http://themgc.tumblr.com and renaming this blog as “themgcOLD.” Just some changes beneficial to our logistics team.

To avoid confusion, please click this link and click the *follow* button to read updates about our club!

Thank you! Have a great day! :)

Our contest website has been redesigned to include your winning entry! Spread the word! You guys rock - look for your prize in the mail.

http://pages.simonandschuster.com/thesorcerersapprentices/contestresults

Thank you @freepressbooks! It was a great learning experience just working on the dish. We will continue to learn more.

{17 March 2011}

We had the awesome opportunity of meeting Chef Grant Achatz of the 3-star Michelin restaurant, Alinea (Chicago). Very inspirational.

His book Life, on the Line written with Nick Kokonas is also out on the shelves. It’s worth checking out.

"One of America’s greatest chefs shares how his drive to cook immaculate food won him international renown — and fueled his miraculous triumph of tongue cancer." - Back cover of book

Acuario

Smoked Mackerel with Black Tea Quail Egg and Chive ”Seafoam” atop a Hot Green Tea Gelee

The MGC’s official entry to The Sorcerer’s Apprentices Contest!
http://pages.simonandschuster.com/thesorcerersapprentices/ 

 

Throughout our history, humanity has relied on the Earth’s waters. Our civilizations harvest its living bounty to feed, sustain and nourish us. Cooks, then, have the unique task of taking that bounty and transforming it into the vibrant cuisines that have fed us and ones we have yet to discover.

Inspired by Ferran Adria and elBulli’s modern, playful and intelligently prepared dishes, we strived to capture that epicurean spirit in a dish which portrays the seaside’s harvest. We are inspired by the Bay Area’s abundance in natural resources and cultures just as Ferran is inspired by the sights, sounds and smell of everything in Roses, Spain.

We chose an ornately shaped glass bowl to showcase the dish’s elements in a whimsical fashion.  At the bottom of the dish there is a dark pool of black forbidden rice, acting as a delicious nest of nutty flavours and a playful representation of the ocean’s bed. Atop the rice is an assortment of seaweeds, all suspended in a bright-colored warm green tea gelee with hints of grass and ocean water. The quail egg, sous vide to a custardy state is carefully placed on the surface of the gelee as if it was calmly floating. The protagonists of our dish are two pristine pieces of tea smoked mackerel and laid upon the gelee. Finally it is finished with a chive “sea foam” for a bright, fresh flavour to act as the tongues refuge from the smoky aspects of the dish.


Black Tea Quail Egg
2  quail eggs
Marinade:
4  cinnamon sticks
4  star anise
4tbsp.  Soy sauce
1Tbsp.  Salt
8bags  black tea (used Lipton Black Pearl)
4cups  water

  1. Simmer marinade until volume is reduced by half. Set aside to cool.
  2. Set sous vide immersion circulator to 65C.
  3.  Cook eggs for 45minutes at 65C.
  4.  Shock eggs in cold water.
  5.  Tap one side of the eggs on a hard surface to crack the shell.
  6.  Soak eggs in Marinade for 30minutes.
  7.  Peel carefully.
     

Hot Tea Soup Gelee
6 tbsp.  Cooked black “forbidden” rice, cooled to room temperature
A few pieces of dried seaweed, rehydrated (tosaka obtained in Japantown)
420g  water
2bags  green tea (leaf green tea, not powdered maicha)
0.86g  agar agar powder
1/4tsp.  dashi (powdered)

  1. Place 3tbsp. rice on the bottom of two heat resistant glass bowls. Arrange rehydrated seaweeds on top of the rice. Set aside.
  2. Heat water until it reaches 70C. Remove from heat. Transfer 400g water to a quart plastic container. Set aside remaining 20g.
  3. Monitor water temperature. Once it reaches 60C, drop the tea bags in and push down once or twice to soak them. Leave tea bags for 3-5minutes.
  4. Remove tea bags and weigh tea (there will be some weight loss due to evaporation). Add water (saved from Step 1) to bring weight back up to 400g.
  5. Transfer half of the tea to a bowl and the other half into a small sauce pot.
  6. Add dashi to the tea in the bowl. Stir to dissolve.
  7. Bring tea in the sauce pot to a gentle boil and add the agar agar, whisking until agar agar is completely dissolved.
  8. Remove from heat and pour in a slow stream over the tea in the bowl while whisking gently but constantly (agar agar will set at 35C; you want to avoid this temperature at this point to prevent tiny bits of gel from forming).
  9. Working quickly, carefully spoon agar-tea mixture over the prepared serving bowls until it covers the seaweeds.
     
  10. When gelee is starting to set, place Black Tea Quail Egg on the gelee, near the rim.
  11. Let sit undisturbed until the gel is set.

Smoked Mackerel
1tsp.  Soy sauce
100g  Mackerel fillet cut into 1”x2” strips, skin on
1cup  Lapsang souchong tea

  1. Toss fish fillets in soy sauce.
  2. Place tea in a Dutch oven. Roll 3 pieces of foil and arrange inside the Dutch oven on top of the tea to serve as a rack for the fish.
  3. Turn stove to high heat.
  4. When the tea is starting so smoke heavily, arrange fillets on top of foil rack. Put the lid on and smoke fish for 4 minutes.
  5. Remove from heat. Open lid and carefully remove fish with a spatula. Let sit for 1 minute.

Chive Foam
125g  water
125g  vegetable oil
12.5g  chives, rough chop
Salt, to taste
0.38g  Xanthan gum
25g  soy lecithin
isi canister w/ 2 charges of nitrous oxide

  1. In a blender, puree chives in water and oil. Season to taste.
  2. When pureed, turn blender on low and add xanthan gum and soy lecithin into the vortex of the whirring chive puree.
  3. Once fully incorporated, pour mixture into an isi canister. Screw lid on and equip with 2 charges of nitrous oxide. Shake canister vigorously.
  4. Squeeze out the foam onto a small bowl.

TO SERVE

  1. Reheat tea gelee in 80C or 176F oven for 10minutes, checking every 5 minutes to make sure gelee doesn’t melt.
  2. Remove from oven.
  3. Arrange fish on top of the gelee.
  4. Spoon foam on the side or on top of fish.
     
  5. Serve immediately, cautioning diner of the hot bowl.
     
     

{24 February 2011}

Experiment #2: ”Egg Drops”

A “spherification” by dropping egg yolk to warm clarified butter.

{02 February 2011}

Our first meeting and experiment ever as club. We are hoping for many more quarters of existence.

Experiment #1: “Ants on a log”

Spherified Acai berry juice
Celery Noodles
Peanut butter powder (using tapioca maltodextrin)

Hello everyone!
We are the Molecular Gastronomy Club of the International Culinary Schools at the Art Institute of California in San Francisco. 
Our club meets to conduct research on different topics of Molecular Gastronomy. Based on this research, club members have the opportunity to formulate culinary projects or recipes and put them into action at subsequent meetings. We will cover general basics and trends of modern Molecular Gastronomy, and the scope of the projects will be a product of each member’s imagination. In this way, we hope to foster innovation amongst our members. Club events may include but aren’t limited to field trips to sites that practice a form of Molecular Gastronomy, cooking demonstrations/ lessons for AI students, and guest speakers on food science and artistry. The club welcomes and supports all majors who want to learn, whether it be a singular meeting or a long term membership. For culinary students, this is an excellent opportunity to enrich kitchen and classroom understanding. This is the ideal environment for those who want to investigate food science or practice the latest food trends.
This blog will serve as a chronicle of the different activities we have.

Hello everyone!

We are the Molecular Gastronomy Club of the International Culinary Schools at the Art Institute of California in San Francisco. 

Our club meets to conduct research on different topics of Molecular Gastronomy. Based on this research, club members have the opportunity to formulate culinary projects or recipes and put them into action at subsequent meetings. We will cover general basics and trends of modern Molecular Gastronomy, and the scope of the projects will be a product of each member’s imagination. In this way, we hope to foster innovation amongst our members. Club events may include but aren’t limited to field trips to sites that practice a form of Molecular Gastronomy, cooking demonstrations/ lessons for AI students, and guest speakers on food science and artistry. The club welcomes and supports all majors who want to learn, whether it be a singular meeting or a long term membership. For culinary students, this is an excellent opportunity to enrich kitchen and classroom understanding. This is the ideal environment for those who want to investigate food science or practice the latest food trends.

This blog will serve as a chronicle of the different activities we have.